Anonymous said: What's your uni room like? I'm a fresher too ^-^

I love my room! This is it right now -

Hope you’re having a lovely post-freshers!

sour-carolina said: omg girl, I'm in love with your blog I'd love to be friends with you fo realz, I'm in my third year of BSc Biology, I'd love to hear how's your college experience been so far : )

Ahhh Thank you :D Uni’s been amaaaazing, I’ve finally got my room all sorted, so now it’s just dealing with the insane amounts of reading ahaha

Japanese honeybee. (Apis cerana japonica)
Bees are freaking awesome. Everyone already knows how awesome they are, right?
WRONG.
Take everything you thought you knew about the extent of bee’s rad-ness and throw it out the window because it’s time for the japanese honeybee and I promise you - you aren’t ready.
One of this bee’s main threats is the Asian giant hornet. Usually, a single hornet will arrive at the honeybee nest, scout it out, and then return later with a full blown gang of around 30 others to attack the nest.
Considering that Asian giant hornets can be almost three times the size of the Japanese honeybee, you’d assume that they’re pretty much screwed the second a hornet shows up… right?
WRONG AGAIN.
The first time a hornet approaches the hive, the bees will disappear just inside the entrance, luring the hornet in. Then- BAM. OVER FIVE HUNDRED BEES SWARM OUT OF THE HIVE AND SURROUND THE HORNET, BEATING THEIR WINGS LIKE A MAD MAN TO RAISE THE TEMPERATURE AROUND THE HORNET TO 47°C (117°F), LITERALLY BAKING THEIR ATTACKER TO DEATH.

BEES.
DON’T.
MESS.
Image: Satoshi Kamitani {

Japanese honeybee. (Apis cerana japonica)

Bees are freaking awesome. Everyone already knows how awesome they are, right?

WRONG.

Take everything you thought you knew about the extent of bee’s rad-ness and throw it out the window because it’s time for the japanese honeybee and I promise you - you aren’t ready.

One of this bee’s main threats is the Asian giant hornet. Usually, a single hornet will arrive at the honeybee nest, scout it out, and then return later with a full blown gang of around 30 others to attack the nest.

Considering that Asian giant hornets can be almost three times the size of the Japanese honeybee, you’d assume that they’re pretty much screwed the second a hornet shows up… right?

WRONG AGAIN.

The first time a hornet approaches the hive, the bees will disappear just inside the entrance, luring the hornet in. Then- BAM. OVER FIVE HUNDRED BEES SWARM OUT OF THE HIVE AND SURROUND THE HORNET, BEATING THEIR WINGS LIKE A MAD MAN TO RAISE THE TEMPERATURE AROUND THE HORNET TO 47°C (117°F), LITERALLY BAKING THEIR ATTACKER TO DEATH.

BEES.

DON’T.

MESS.

Image: Satoshi Kamitani

Anonymous said: i dont know why but i totally ship you and astronomy-to-zoology *^=^*

y3s-pl34se:

goldenorigamiowl:

zoology-bro:

Andrew we did it. It’s official. We can quit tumblr now. We won.

acryptozoo // astronomy-to-zoology

Is anyone else picturing Andrew desperately trying to tell Coral about a snail they found but Coral is just bouncing off the walls and yelling about how awesome and shiny it is…

image

my hand slipped

oH MY GOD

Anonymous said: i dont know why but i totally ship you and astronomy-to-zoology *^=^*

Andrew we did it. It’s official. We can quit tumblr now. We won.

acryptozoo // astronomy-to-zoology

Hairy frog. (Trichobatrachus robustus)
Everybody sit down, because I promise that you aren’t ready for the tornado of badassery that I am about to send your way.

When attacked, the hairy frog will break its own bones and force them through its toe pads to create mad claw-type-things. 
Yup. 
This frog goes full wolverine on whatever was crazy enough to take it on. Although it isn’t known how the frog retracts it’s insane bone-claws (no one was stupid enough to hang around once they saw it enter X-men mode, clearly), it’s thought that the claws later retract passively, while the damaged tissue is regenerated.
It’s literally a few drops of adamantium away from changing its name to Logan. 
Image: Gustavo Carra
Also known as: Horror frog (no I’m not joking) {

Hairy frog. (Trichobatrachus robustus)

Everybody sit down, because I promise that you aren’t ready for the tornado of badassery that I am about to send your way.

When attacked, the hairy frog will break its own bones and force them through its toe pads to create mad claw-type-things.

Yup. 

This frog goes full wolverine on whatever was crazy enough to take it on. Although it isn’t known how the frog retracts it’s insane bone-claws (no one was stupid enough to hang around once they saw it enter X-men mode, clearly), it’s thought that the claws later retract passively, while the damaged tissue is regenerated.

It’s literally a few drops of adamantium away from changing its name to Logan. 

Image: Gustavo Carra

Also known as: Horror frog (no I’m not joking)

Andrew did a thing.

So it’s been a very good couple of weeks. I made a lot of cakes (a lot) and got into university! But I already made a post about that. This post is to congratulate Andrew!

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, or are very very very new to the zoology side of tumblr, you’ll know that Andrew over at astronomy-to-zoology recently hit 30,000 followers. That’s a lot of people.

Andrew is one of very few people I know who has never told me to shut up about my snails, or to stop rambling about lemurs, or anything really, and has probably been equally (most likely more) excited than me about invertebrates - which is hard to do.

I literally can’t think of any blog more deserving of the attention his gets every day. SO GO ANDREW. YEAH.

CORAL OUT.

maraudering-around said: Hey, i'm going to Reading too! Just thought i'd come say hi and congratulations! :)

AH!!! This is so awesome I’ve had so many messages from people getting into Reading!! Congratulations!!!

University!

Holy moly I got into university how on earth did I do that good lord.

Officially going to be studying Zoology at the university of Reading!!!! YEAAAAH BUDDY.

Vampire moth. (Calyptra thalictri)
So this may be the most terrifyingly wonderful moth I have ever seen. Brace yourselves, people.
The “Vampire moth” mainly feeds on fruit, using its proboscis to drink the juice within. Pretty standard, right? He’s just a little beige cutie pie? NOPE. NOT ONE BIT MY FRIEND.
Apparently fruit isn’t good enough for these guys. The males of the species will also use their proboscis to pierce the skin of vertebrates and drink their blood. 
ALSO; the proboscis itself is barbed. It’s like some crazy nightmare super-straw.
AND IT DOESN’T END THERE. Other species of Calyptra are known to suck tears from the eyelids of cattle. 
TEARS.
THESE MOTHS ARE SO HARDCORE I CAN’T DEAL WITH IT.
THEY DRINK BLOOD. AND TEARS.
SO. HARD. CORE.
MOTHS.
Image. {

Vampire moth. (Calyptra thalictri)

So this may be the most terrifyingly wonderful moth I have ever seen. Brace yourselves, people.

The “Vampire moth” mainly feeds on fruit, using its proboscis to drink the juice within. Pretty standard, right? He’s just a little beige cutie pie? NOPE. NOT ONE BIT MY FRIEND.

Apparently fruit isn’t good enough for these guys. The males of the species will also use their proboscis to pierce the skin of vertebrates and drink their blood.

ALSO; the proboscis itself is barbed. It’s like some crazy nightmare super-straw.

AND IT DOESN’T END THERE. Other species of Calyptra are known to suck tears from the eyelids of cattle. 

TEARS.

THESE MOTHS ARE SO HARDCORE I CAN’T DEAL WITH IT.

THEY DRINK BLOOD. AND TEARS.

SO. HARD. CORE.

MOTHS.

Image.

Hooded pitohui. (Pitohui dichrous)
A poisonous bird? Rad.
The hooded pitohui - alongside its two other close relatives (Variable pitohui & Rusty pitohui) - was the first ever bird to be documented as poisonous.
This bird is seriously so awesome. Its feathers and skin contain the exact same poison that is found in Poison Dart Frogs. This chemical is actually the most powerful natural toxin known to man. It’s not present in very high quantities though, so for the most part these birds will only cause numbness, tingling and other minor symptoms when touched (basically they’re not deadly unless you got like 50 of them and rubbed them all over your face). 
It’s thought that the bird gets its poison from its diet; which is mainly Choresine beetles.
Things learnt today:
Birds are rad on so many levels.
Do not cover your face in Hooded pitohuis.
Anyone who tells you that birds are boring is wrong and clearly just jealous of the majestic wonder that is the Hooded pitohui.
Image: Mark Harper {

Hooded pitohui. (Pitohui dichrous)

A poisonous bird? Rad.

The hooded pitohui - alongside its two other close relatives (Variable pitohui & Rusty pitohui) - was the first ever bird to be documented as poisonous.

This bird is seriously so awesome. Its feathers and skin contain the exact same poison that is found in Poison Dart Frogs. This chemical is actually the most powerful natural toxin known to man. It’s not present in very high quantities though, so for the most part these birds will only cause numbness, tingling and other minor symptoms when touched (basically they’re not deadly unless you got like 50 of them and rubbed them all over your face)

It’s thought that the bird gets its poison from its diet; which is mainly Choresine beetles.

Things learnt today:

  1. Birds are rad on so many levels.
  2. Do not cover your face in Hooded pitohuis.
  3. Anyone who tells you that birds are boring is wrong and clearly just jealous of the majestic wonder that is the Hooded pitohui.

Image: Mark Harper

slihgtlydyslexic said: Hi there! I've been doing my own research on a possible future in studying Zoology at University and thankgod I found the 'zoological' side of tumblr, and I was just wondering how did you prepare yourself for your studies at College/Uni during your highschool years? I think I have tried to apply at every Department of Conservation and Zoo in my area for conservation work for some extra experience and we have a law where there is an age limit(18), what would you recommend I do to prepare myself?

Hello! I’ve actually only just finished high school myself, so I don’t find out whether or not I’ve gotten into university until the 14th of August - a date that I am dreading.

The main advice I would give is to just continue being as proactive as you currently are! I managed to get offers from all 5 of the universities I applied to, and the main thing they all said made the biggest impact was me getting actively involved in the zoological community. 

I did a lot of volunteer work at zoos, and still currently do work at my local nature reserve and london wildlife trust as a whole, which definitely helped a lot with firsthand knowledge on conservation, and people skills (which oddly enough, is needed an awful lot for work in zoology). I know zoos may seem way more exciting, but never underestimate nature reserves!!! A lot of my best memories have been whilst working at my nature reserve, and I’m pretty sure it’s what gave me the most experience.

Most of all, stick around in the ‘zoological side of tumblr’. I don’t think there is any other place in which such an amazing group of people all come together sharing one common interest. You’ll observe and be a part of debates and discussions on important zoological and biological matters with people that are seriously high up in their field; and that’s something that I don’t think you’ll get anywhere else.

YOU GOT THIS.

-Coral

Hey look I disappeared again

Yes, I disappeared once again without explanation. 

Yes, I am writing another apology post.

I had exams, which were hell, but they’re over now so LETS DO THIS.

ZoologyBro on twitter?!

I MADE A PROPER TWITTER. I’ll be doing the Garden Bio Blitz during my revision breaks today and tomorrow so make sure to go and follow!

@ZoologyBRO

Pen-tailed treeshrew. (Ptilocercus lowii)
Do not let the adorable fluffyness of this guy fool you. He is HARD. CORE.

The pen-tailed treeshrew is the only known wild mammal that chronically (i.e., on the reg.) consumes alcohol. OH and not just a quick sip and he’s heading back home, OH NO NO NO MY FRIEND - a study of the treeshrew in Malaysia found that it spends several hours consuming the equivalent of 10 to 12 glasses of wine with an alcohol content of up to 3.8% every night drinking naturally fermented nectar of the bertam palm.
AND IT DOESN’T END THERE. After it’s night of INSANE drinking, you’d obviously expect it to be a tad wobbly to say the least…
NO. 
THIS GUY AIN’T NO LIGHTWEIGHT PAL. The pen-tailed treeshrew shows no signs of intoxication. At. All.
At only 13cm high, the pen-tailed treeshrew could - pound for pound - drink most humans under the table. EVERY. NIGHT.
Slow clap it out, guys. Slow clap it out.
Image. {

Pen-tailed treeshrew. (Ptilocercus lowii)

Do not let the adorable fluffyness of this guy fool you. He is HARD. CORE.

The pen-tailed treeshrew is the only known wild mammal that chronically (i.e., on the reg.) consumes alcohol. OH and not just a quick sip and he’s heading back home, OH NO NO NO MY FRIEND - a study of the treeshrew in Malaysia found that it spends several hours consuming the equivalent of 10 to 12 glasses of wine with an alcohol content of up to 3.8% every night drinking naturally fermented nectar of the bertam palm.

AND IT DOESN’T END THERE. After it’s night of INSANE drinking, you’d obviously expect it to be a tad wobbly to say the least…

NO.

THIS GUY AIN’T NO LIGHTWEIGHT PAL. The pen-tailed treeshrew shows no signs of intoxication. At. All.

At only 13cm high, the pen-tailed treeshrew could - pound for pound - drink most humans under the table. EVERY. NIGHT.

Slow clap it out, guys. Slow clap it out.

Image.